Special retirement supplement and TSP


Q. I am looking at retiring in January 2015. I will be 56 years old Oct. 15. I will have 30 years in as of Dec. 24. Waiting until the end of leave year to cash in all available annual leave. I am looking at cashing out my Thrift Savings Plan in a lump sum to pay off all debts. Will that income be considered part of earned income so that the special retirement supplement is reduced?

If so, would it be in my interest to retire at the end of 2014 so that my annual leave hits that year instead of 2015? I will have more than 1,800 hours of sick leave accrued by the end of 2014. Can that be used to offset the age so that I could perhaps retire earlier so that the TSP lump sum is counted in 2014?

A. Mike: No, the TSP distribution will not be considered earned income. It is considered ordinary income.

Reg: Unused sick leave is only added after you have met the age and service requirements to retire. Therefore, to avoid the 5 percent-per-year age penalty imposed on those retiring under the MRA+10 provision, you’ll have to wait until you reach your MRA and have 30 years of actual service. Regardless of whether you retire at the end of 2014 or the beginning of 2015, you wouldn’t receive a lump-sum payment for your unused annual leave until 2015. It will be considered to earned income, so the annual Social Security earnings limit would apply. Depending on how much annual leave you’ll be cashing in, it could reduce or eliminate the special retirement supplement for 2015.


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Mike Miles is a Certified Financial Planner licensee and principal adviser for Variplan LLC, an independent fiduciary in Vienna, Virginia. Email your financial questions to fedexperts@federaltimes.com and view his blog at money.federaltimes.com.

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