Q. A newsletter I received states there are several TSP millionaires. What is the general characteristics of a TSP millionaire? Are they in management? Upper G-level ratings? Is it the amount that is allocated and the way in which it is invested? I have invested the total amount that I can, plus investing the total amount to catch up after 50 for 31 years, and I am not close to being millionaire.

Q. Do you have an opinion on subscribing to TSP Advisors? When you subscribe, they are supposed to assist in managing TSP funds. Are TSP financial advisers more beneficial?

Q. I’m 27 years old and work for the U.S. Postal Service. I have about $10,000 saved in my TSP, and I just moved most of my savings from the G Fund into 70 percent C fund and 30 percent split between the G, I and S funds. At my age, is this a smart move for the long run?

Q. I’ll be turning 70½ in 2018 and will start withdrawing my required minimum distribution. My plan is to leave my funds with TSP, then receive the minimum monthly payment and the rest at the end of each year. I’m going to invest a small amount in a balance account. The rest of the money I would like to save for my family. Should I put it in a regular savings account to be safe, or would you suggest something different?

Q. I will be retiring from the U.S. Postal Service in September after 30 years. I started Roth deposits in my TSP in 2014. I know if I withdraw before five years (Jan. 1, 2019), the interest portion from the Roth part will be taxable along with the conventional part. If I withdraw monthly before Jan. 1, 2019, will the interest in the Roth portion become tax-exempt after Jan. 1, 2019, or do I have to wait until Jan. 1, 2019, to start withdrawals to keep the Roth portion tax-exempt later on?

Q. I am having difficulty finding the definition of substantial earnings. My Social Security statement shows “Your Taxed Social Security Earnings.” Is that the same as substantial earnings? If not, how do I find out what my substantial earnings are? I have the chart listing the substantial earnings for each year.

Q. I joined federal service in July 1985, at which time I was placed under FERS. Between July 1985 and January 1987, the official start-up date of FERS, I was not able to contribute to the TSP.  Since January 1987 I have contributed the maximum 10 percent to TSP.  As I get closer to retirement I’m curious if the government recognizes the lost opportunity of not being able to make TSP contributions between July 1985 and January 1987. Is there any way to make-up for lost TSP contributions and lost government matching?

Q. I am a full-time federal technician in the Air National Guard. I am 54 years old with 33-plus years of military time and 27-plus years as a federal technician (under FERS). I have recently been involuntarily separated from the Air National Guard. This means I am losing both my full-time technician position as well as my part-time military position. I understand that I will be able to draw my FERS retirement (based on my total federal time) along with the Federal Retirement Supplement. Based on my involuntary separation, am I able to start drawing from my TSP without penalty?

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