Browsing: FERS

Q. I retired under FERS and receive the supplement. Will the sale of a second home be considered wages, thus reducing my supplement or completely eliminating it?   A. Proceeds from the sale of a home are not considered wages for any purpose that I am aware of.

Q. I have 43 years of service: 22 years under CSRS, which includes 4 years military active duty that I “ bought back,” as well as 21 years under FERS. There was no break in service. Will my 4 years of active duty, in which I paid Social Security, give me essentially 25 years of “ substantial earnings” towards the WEP provision? A. It depends upon how much you earned year. The schedule of annual earnings required to qualify as “substantial” is available at https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10045.pdf. You can compare the earnings for year as listed in your Social Security benefit statement…

Q. I hope to retire in 2020 under the FERS retirement system. My spouse is a school teacher, does not pay into Social Security, and is covered by the Ohio State Teachers Retirement System (STRS). Will either of us lose a substantial amount of survivor benefits when one of us passes due to the WEP or GPO? A. The windfall elimination provision does not apply to survivor’s benefits, but the government pension offset may reduce or eliminate your wife’s survivor benefit, if she survives you.

Q. I currently have a TSP account as an FERS employee, with 100 percent is in the L2040 Fund since I started almost 3 years ago. I have a long way until retirement, as I am 37 years old. Someone said I should do the “CSI,”  which would be C Fund=40 percent; S Fund=40 percent; I Fund=20 percent, but I’m not sure what that even means.  I would like to look forward to a comfortable retirement so suggestions are welcome and much appreciated! A. You should ask the “someone” whether they will take responsibility for the outcomes their advice will produce.…

Q. If I retire from civil service (under FERS) and I return to work as a civil servant at a later date, I know that my annuity will be subtracted from my pay. However, will I be able to contribute to TSP again? If so, can I contribute to my original TSP account or would I have to start over with another account? A. You will allowed to contribute to the TSP for during any period of eligible employment under TSP’s rules: https://www.tsp.gov/PlanParticipation/EligibilityAndContributions/index.html. A new TSP account will be opened for you when your are eligibly employed.

Q. I work for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and am currently 65 years old. I started working for the federal government on July 4, 2010. The plan is to continue working as long as I can, past 70. When I retire it will be under FERS (born Sept. 12, 1953). Do I start taking Social Security at age 70 if I’m still working? Also, can I continue putting money into my TSP after age 70 and 1/2 (the required minimum distribution age)? Are there any other things I should be aware of if I retire after age…

Q. I’m a FERS employee. As I reach retirement and knowing about my retirement and Social Security, what is the best way to maximize my TSP? If I have $1 million in my TSP, would moving the money from the C Fund to the G Fund and implement the 4 percent rule without wavering on my withdrawals would I run out of money? If the G Fund pays 1-2 percent every year I still seem to leave this Earth with money remaining. Looking at 4 percent calculation models, if you’re making an average above the 4 percent you wind up…

Q. I am a FERS employee age 47 with 27 years of service. I am currently on FMLA and will be resigning and applying for medical disability retirement. I know I can withdraw from my TSP but am not clear on the annuity option tax penalty. I want to withdraw funds to sustain me while waiting for a decision on my disability retirement. A. If you receive a TSP distribution before you reach age  59 ½, in addition to the regular income tax, you may have to pay an early withdrawal penalty tax equal to 10 percent of any taxable…

1 2 3 17