Q. I recently took a VERA retirement from federal service at age 55. My understanding is that the 10 percent withdrawal penalty does not apply to subsequent TSP withdrawals. Originally, I chose a monthly fixed dollar amount of a full withdrawal that could be changed during open season, but with the TSP Modernization Act I can start and stop installments, as well as change withholding. Originally, I had planned to withdraw the full amount of my TSP over 5 years, but last month I chose a lesser amount to take out and TSP sent me a letter that my TSP…

Q. I am divorced and my ex received a lump sum payment from my TSP account. When can she begin receiving benefits? She is 62 years old now. Are her benefits in anyway tied to my age and retirement? A. Once her share has been removed from your TSP account and distributed to her, it is hers to do with as she chooses. Her options are no longer connected with your age.

Q. I am happy that under the TSP Modernization Act governing TSP withdrawals that I have the options to withdraw my funds monthly, quarterly or annually. If I depended on my TSP for one of my retirement income streams, are there any advantages or disadvantages when I choose how to withdraw my money given the choices now available? A. You should start with monthly distributions since that will enable you to most closely match your withdrawals to your spending.

Q. My brother, and only sibling, died recently. I am the executor and beneficiary of his estate. He never married, nor did he have children. I am inheriting: $770,000 from an employer 401(k) managed by Vanguard; $73,000 from a past 403(b) pension; and $320,000 in life insurance proceeds. I am 59, receive a military pension ($60,000/year), and am employed full time by the federal government. I have $500,000 in the TSP. Can any of the inherited funds be rolled into my TSP? Can any or all of the inherited funds be combined into a single fund? What would you do? A. The TSP…

Q. I am scheduled for full/voluntary retirement in February 2023. I currently have my TSP contribution at 100 percent in the L2030 fund. I am getting a little nervous about the volatility of the market, so I am inclined to do something like reallocate to 50 percent L2030 and 50 percent G Fund just to try and mitigate any potential losses. Of course, I would like to increase my current $253,000 balance, but wouldn’t be averse to it not increasing that much by retirement. Conversely, I would hate to see a loss on what I have and not be able to…

Q. My ex-husband has given me the forms to receive money from his TSP account, but what form do I use to roll it over into my IRA account?  A. The distribution request form should contain a section where you can direct the proceeds to be paid to your IRA custodian for your benefit. If not, you’ll have to roll the funds over yourself using your IRA custodian’s deposit form.

Q. I had 12 years service under CSRS, a break of 13 years in the private sector, and have been a CSRS Offset employee since 2003. I understand that the government pension offset could reduce my wife’s Social Security spousal benefits by $2 for ever $3 I would receive from my CSRS annuity. Does this apply just to the annuity earned while a CSRS employee or the annuity I would receive for my total government service? Since she has earned her own Social Security benefit from non-government service, and I have 30 years of substantial earnings under Social Security, including the years…

Q. I am currently a CSRS Offset employee. Between private sector employment and Offset employment, I will have over 30 years of paying into Social Security. By the time I retire, I will have 30 years of combined CSRS (12 years) and CSRS Offset (18 years) employment. Is there some formula that weighs pure CSRS vs Offset employment. Will the WEP still negatively affect my Social Security payments? A. There is no simple formula for this. You’ll need to calculate your benefits under each system to compare them. The WEP will affect your Social Security benefit unless you have 30…

Q. I am about to turn 65 and I have FEHB. Is there any reason to sign up for Medicare part B. The literature on this is confusing and never really answers the question yes or no. Does paying the extra cost of part B make sense? What is the advantage? A. There is not one-size-fits-all way to make this decision. You should only apply for and pay for Medicare Part B, in addition to comprehensive major medical coverage, if you are confident that you will recover at least as much in additional benefits than you will pay in premiums…

1 2 3 4 5 298