Q. I divorced five years ago, after my retirement. My ex-spouse received 50 percent of my TSP. I’m now remarried. I would like to do a full withdraw option now that I’m going to quit my second career (have reached the age of 64), but am confused on the options. Do I have to select the 50 percent survivor benefit and, if so, should our marriage not work out in the long run will I, again, lose half of my TSP?

Q. I was told that I can still contribute to TSP after I retire from the military at 20 years. However, when trying to clarify that information I stumbled upon your blog and saw this Q&A:   Q: I enlisted in the Marine Corps and signed up for the Thrift Savings Plan in 2004. I was severely injured in Iraq in 2005 and was retired from active service in 2006. I am now receiving Combat Related Special Compensation, Social Security and my compensation from the Veterans Administration. Can I continue to add to my TSP account as a military retiree?…

Q. I have a TSP (Roth & Traditional) via uniformed service; I also have employer retirement accounts with TIAA (both Roth & Traditional), which is a 403(b). [I believe the scenario below would be the same for those with a 401(k).] To try to tease out and maintain the Roth funds for later, at separation/retirement from the reserves I am planning to take the one time bulk distribution (95-99 percent) of my TSP and have it be a direct rollover to my TIAA accounts. Once the TSP funds are in my applicable 403(b) Roth and 403(b) Traditional accounts at TIAA, I…

Q. I plan on retiring from 33 years of federal service with the Department of Defense. I have $1 million in my TSP and want to convert some of it each year to a Roth account. After retiring, I expect my taxable income to be about $100,000 per year. After retiring, if I transfer $50,000 per year from my TSP to a Roth account, what will my tax rate be?  Note: I’m assuming the federal tax rate between $77,000 and $165,000 is 22 percent, for over $600,000 is 37%. Would I be taxed 22 percent on the $50,000, since $100,000 +…

Q. I am planning to begin taking monthly payments from my L2030 fund at around age 60. I am 52, currently with $1.1 million in invested assets. I generally subscribe to your theory of “pick the L Fund closest to your life expectancy,” minus 10 years in my case. For example, if I expect to live to 2050, I would choose the L2040 fund (based on my risk tolerance). Given the above, at age 60, let’s say I want to exhaust my L fund within 30 years – can you give me a ballpark percentage per year that I could…

Q. You’ve mentioned in the past that if a person does not know which funds are best to invest their TSP money, they should invest in the Lifecycle fund that closely matches their life expectancy. I’m 58, retired CSRS and currently in the L2030. I plan to start generating a monthly income stream from the $470,000 balance and begin payments of 3.5 percent of the balance to meet expenses. When commencing monthly payments, do you recommend keeping the funds in the corresponding L Fund or should I look at a more conservative strategy during the draw-down phase?

Q. I am a federal dual-status technician with the LA guard. I am 50 as of March 2018 and will have 28 years federal technician time on Sept. 22, 2018. Can I voluntarily retire and draw my FERS retirement, the supplement and my TSP  without being penalized the 10 percent? My actual minimum retirement age is 56 years and 8 months.

Q. I plan to retire from federal service in about three years and start my TSP withdrawals then. My wife will continue working at that point; she has a 401(k)-like plan at her job that she contributes money to now. She also gets a fixed contribution from her employer, i.e., it does not depend on her contribution. Once I retire, should she continue contributing to her 401(k) or not? That is, she could keep contributing $X a year and I would end up taking $X more out of TSP.  Or, she could stop contributing and I would take $X less out…

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